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November 4, 2019

         Stormwater runoff can transport a large list of pollutants to surface waters and groundwater.  In Spring Creek the effects of runoff from the Centre Region can be detected in the presence and diversity macroinvertebrates than normally live in the stream bottom and feed the fish. 

Stormwater runoff originates from all types of impervious surfaces such as roof tops and paved roadways.  Although we often associate stormwater runoff with highly de...

Some 70 years ago, Thompson Run was a classic limestone trout stream. It began at Thompson Spring, located about 200 yards southwest of the Duck Pond.  From the spring, Thompson Run ran down a sluiceway located where the center line of Benner Pike is now. It then joined the present streambed, flowed behind Blaise Alexander Auto

Photo 1: Thompson Spring - 2016

Sales and Your Building Center, and meandered through a meadow for a mile or so before its confluence with Slab Cabin Run, a short distance...

Introduction

The temperature of spring and stream water within the Spring Creek watershed in central Pennsylvania is important for many water uses, especially maintaining healthy aquatic ecosystems, water recreation and a highly-valued trout fishery.  Trout are stressed when water temperatures exceed about 68.0 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) and temperatures above about 74.2 °F can be lethal.  Many headwater mountain streams and springs emerge from the forested uplands with non-carbonate rocks such as s...

Beginning in 1999 monitoring of stream and spring water quality was initiated by the Spring Creek Watershed Association to provide data to citizens, business leaders and public officials to better protect and manage water resources.  The Water Resources Monitoring Project involves quarterly sampling of 15 stream sites and 8 springs mainly during low flows (see Figs. 1-2 for locations of and Table 1 for descriptions of monitoring sites).  Monitoring is largely supported by local municipalities an...

Pennsylvania is facing increasing problems with incursions of aquatic invasive species (AIS). One of the most recent invaders is New Zealand Mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) (NZM), which was discovered in Spring Creek in 2013. This was the first known occurrence of the species on the U.S. Atlantic slope. NZM have the potential to create a negative competitive impact on benthic communities of infested waterways, thus disrupting the base of the food web upon which higher organisms, such as fish...

Stormwater is excess rain or snowmelt that floods the land surface. On an open undisturbed  landscape most rainwater soaks into the ground and the overflow eventually discharges into the nearest watercourse. However, in an urban environment, most land is impervious, i.e., covered with roads, buildings and parking lots, thus the volume of rainwater that can’t soak into the ground is overwhelming, creating extensive flooding, erosion, stream pollution, and physical damage to the stream bed. This i...

Centre County continues to grow with each U.S. Census.  This growth is reflected in a 12% population increase from the 2000 Census which had a population of 135,758 residents to the 2010 Census with a population of 153,990.  This population growth trend is continuing with the release of the Census Bureau’s 2016 American Community Survey (ACS) Centre County estimate of 161,464 residents which is approximately 5% more than the 2010 Census.  Based on the 2016 ACS estimate, Centre County is the seco...

October 2, 2017

From the standpoint of water, this is an unlikely place for a city of 100,000 people.  Water is the resource that limits local population growth. I have a personal perspective on the relationship between growth and available water supply.  I grew up here; I studied hydrogeology here; during the 1990s, I more than doubled our well water supply capacity; and I now serve on the board of the sewer authority.  Herein I discuss growth I have seen, where we have obtained our water supply during my time...

The following article has been condensed from the publication “The Fishery of Spring Creek – A Watershed Under Siege” by Robert F. Carline, Rebecca L. Dunlap, Jason E. Detar, and Bruce A. Hollender.

Urban influences in the upper part of the watershed are having negative effects on Spring Creek’s trout fishery.  Given the extensive development in and around the Borough of State College and the PSU campus, impacts on Spring Creek are not surprising.  The effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems...

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