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Map of land use in the Spring Creek Watershed in 2014.

By clicking on the map above, you will open it as a pdf image that you can enlarge.

Rain falls everywhere on the Spring Creek watershed. Where it falls, whether on the forested ridges, the agricultural valleys, or th...

Forested watersheds provide many benefits to humans. One of the most important is to provide clean, clear drinking water but forested watersheds also support fish and wildlife and provide endless recreational opportunities. An often overlooked benefit of forested water...

The Spring Creek Watershed has two types of watershed boundaries as shown on this cross-section diagram.

The surface-water boundary is on the left and the groundwater boundary on the right.  The headwater area of the Big Spring in Bellefonte has its western bo...

The Pennsylvania State Water Plan defined a Critical Water Planning Area (CWPA) as:  “Any significant hydrologic unit where existing or future demands exceed or threaten to exceed the safe yield of available water resources.”  The term "hydrologic unit" is a synonym fo...

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC), in its 2005 Groundwater Management Plan, showed Potentially Stressed Areas on this map on page 18.  Potentially Stressed Area 1, labelled the State College Area, is the Spring Creek Watershed.  The following text is an exc...

Whether a headwaters trout stream or a larger river, all waterways have something in common; they are dynamic systems, which means they are ever-changing and reacting to other processes, both natural and man-made. This is a natural process as the waterway tends to seek...

This article is in preparation. 

This map shows the location of the Ridge Overlay Zone that protects source-water on Tussey Mountain in Ferguson Township.  This source water is ultimately pumped from the Thomas and Harter Well Fields of the State College Borough Water A...

The Spring Creek watershed lies along the eastern edge of the Appalachian Mountains, which extend from Maine to Georgia. Geologically,the Appalachian Mountains are divided into physiographic provinces (Figure 1). 

Figure 1: Physiographic Province Map of Pennsylvania. Cl...

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