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November 4, 2019

         Stormwater runoff can transport a large list of pollutants to surface waters and groundwater.  In Spring Creek the effects of runoff from the Centre Region can be detected in the presence and diversity macroinvertebrates than normally live in the stream bottom and feed the fish. 

Stormwater runoff originates from all types of impervious surfaces such as roof tops and paved roadways.  Although we often associate stormwater runoff with highly de...

Introduction

The temperature of spring and stream water within the Spring Creek watershed in central Pennsylvania is important for many water uses, especially maintaining healthy aquatic ecosystems, water recreation and a highly-valued trout fishery.  Trout are stressed when water temperatures exceed about 68.0 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) and temperatures above about 74.2 °F can be lethal.  Many headwater mountain streams and springs emerge from the forested uplands with non-carbonate rocks such as s...

Beginning in 1999 monitoring of stream and spring water quality was initiated by the Spring Creek Watershed Association to provide data to citizens, business leaders and public officials to better protect and manage water resources.  The Water Resources Monitoring Project involves quarterly sampling of 15 stream sites and 8 springs mainly during low flows (see Figs. 1-2 for locations of and Table 1 for descriptions of monitoring sites).  Monitoring is largely supported by local municipalities an...

Stormwater is excess rain or snowmelt that floods the land surface. On an open undisturbed  landscape most rainwater soaks into the ground and the overflow eventually discharges into the nearest watercourse. However, in an urban environment, most land is impervious, i.e., covered with roads, buildings and parking lots, thus the volume of rainwater that can’t soak into the ground is overwhelming, creating extensive flooding, erosion, stream pollution, and physical damage to the stream bed. This i...

The Pennsylvania State Water Plan defined a Critical Water Planning Area (CWPA) as:  “Any significant hydrologic unit where existing or future demands exceed or threaten to exceed the safe yield of available water resources.”  The term "hydrologic unit" is a synonym for the term "watershed".

The process to designate a watershed a Critical Water Planning Area (CWPA) had five steps.

Stage 1 Nomination:  The Spring Creek Watershed was nominated due to its designation by...

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC), in its 2005 Groundwater Management Plan, showed Potentially Stressed Areas on this map on page 18.  Potentially Stressed Area 1, labelled the State College Area, is the Spring Creek Watershed.  The following text is an excerpt from page 20 that explains the reasons behind this Potentially Stressed Area (PSA) Designation by the SRBC. 

"State College Area. This PSA includes most of the Spring Creek Watershed and some of the headwate...

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